Title: Registration of Korean Cultural Treasures as Parts of the World Heritages 
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Stamp Serial#
2353 
KPC#
C-1819 
StanGib#
MS-2733a 
Scott#
2135a 
Date of Issue
12/09/2003 
Quantity
1,000,000  
Denomination
190 won 
Design
Dolmens in Ganghwa 
Designer
Kim, Sung-am / Kim, Chang-hwan (Photography) 
Image Area
52mm x 24mm 
Perforation
13 
Sheet Composition
1 in the Top-Part;
4 in the Bottom-part of a
Special Sheet 
Paper
White unwatermarked
Printing process
and colors
Offset, six colors + Intaglio, one color 
Print
Korea Minting and Security Printing Corporation 
Description
Dolmens, called 'Goindol' in Korean, are tombs constructed of large stone slabs. Dolmens in Korea, which are representative relics of the Bronze Age, are found nationwide. The dolmens vary in form by time and region. The Northeast Asian region has the largest density of dolmens in the world, and Korea has the greatest number. Over 30 thousand dolmens are believed to be in Korea nationwide. Among them, the dolmen sites in Ganghwa, Hwasoon and Gochang were registered as world heritages in 2000. With their high density and great variety, these dolmens serve as important relics that describe the formation and development process of dolmens. They explicitly demonstrate the technology and social development of the prehistoric age that created these funerary and ceremonial relics. As the dolmens are important relics for the study of the prehistoric age, they are highly valued and targets of preservation.

Dolmens in Ganghwa.
In Ganghwa, Korea's largest northern-type dolmen is found (dolmens piled up like a table), the capstone of which is 7.1 meters long and 2.6 meters tall. Some of the dolmens rise 100 to 200 meters above the sea level, which is higher than the average altitude. Excavated from beneath the dolmens in Naega-myeon were stone daggers, stone arrow-heads and earthenware without any patterns. These relics serve as important data for studying the lifestyle of the prehistoric age.