Title : The 100th Anniversary of the Korean Modern Meteorological Service
Stamp Serial#
2371
KPC#
C-1837 
StanGib#
2750 
Scott#
2142 
Date of Issue
03/25/2004
Quantity
1,600,000 
Denomination
190 won 
Design
Modern Meteorological Service 
Designer
Kim, So-jeong 
Image Area
22mm x 32mm 
Perforation
13 
Sheet Composition
4 x 5 
Paper
White unwatermarked
Printing process
and colors
Photogravure, six colors 
Print
Korea Minting and Security Printing Corporation 
Description
Korea has kept meteorological records since ancient times because it has long been an agricultural nation and its weather conditions vary significantly with the change of the seasons. Under the rule of King Sejong (1397 - 1450) of the Joseon Dynasty (1392 - 1910), the world's first rainfall gauge, the Cheugugi, was invented, enabling accurate measurement of precipitation and scientific observation of the weather.

Modern meteorological service in Korea was launched in March 25, 1904 with the establishment of a meteorological observatory in Mokpo, Jeollanam-do (South Jeolla) province. And in May of the same year, nationwide meteorological observation commenced with the establishment of temporary observatories in Busan, Incheon, Yongampo, and Wonsan. Following the formation of the Korean government in 1948, the National Central Meteorological Observatory was set up under the Ministry of Education. Then, over the years, the Ministry of Transportation and later the Ministry of Science & Technology took charge of the organization until its status was upgraded on December 27, 1990 to become today's National Meteorological Administration.

Currently, the National Meteorological Administration operates a total of 94 meteorological stations nationwide and provides digital weather services utilizing multi-dimensional observation, supercomputers, and numerical weather forecasting technology. The ultimate objective is to protect lives and property from meteorological disasters as well as provide accurate weather forecast.

In celebration of the 100th anniversary of the modern meteorological service in Korea, we are confident that the National Meteorological Administration will continue to maintain an innovative weather forecasting infrastructure and acquire advanced meteorological technologies to safeguard the nation well on to the future.