Title: New Year's Greeting for 2005 
(View Souvenir Sheet)
Stamp Serial#
2421 
KPC#
N-81 
StanGib#
2793 & MS 2793 
Scott#
2165 
Date of Issue
12/01/2004 
Quantity
1,600,000  
Denomination
220 won 
Design
The Hen & Her Chicks 
Designer
Park, Eun-kyung 
Image Area
23mm x 33mm 
Perforation
13 
Sheet Composition
4 x 5 
Paper
White unwatermarked
Printing process
and colors
Photogravure, 6 colors
(photostorage stamp) 
Print
Korea Minting and Security Printing Corporation 
Description
According to the Chinese calendar, 2005 marks "the Year of the Chicken."

Since ancient times, chickens have been regarded as the symbol of success, wealth and personal achievement, and people who pursued academic accomplishments or government posts hung paintings of chickens in their studies. According to Dongguksesigi (book recounting the customs and traditions of the Joseon Dynasty [1392 - 1910]), families greeting the New Year hung paintings depicting chickens or tigers and prayed for misfortune to be dispelled as they believed chickens have the power to drive away evil spirits. Additionally, chickens symbolized having many children, and, as a result, paintings of chickens drawn in the late Joseon Dynasty depicted a hen with a dozen or more chicks in hopes of having many children, which was deemed as one of the five major blessings of life. And because people thought of chickens as something that brings good luck, brides and grooms would make their marital vows in front of depictions of chickens at their wedding ceremonies.

In Korea, chickens are generally praised for having five different types of virtues. In detail, their cockscomb signify "studiousness;" their claws symbolize "martial arts"; the scene of cocks fighting boldly denotes "bravery"; their calling the herd together at the sight of food indicates "patience"; and their habit of crying out at dawn in a punctual manner points out "reliability".

The Korea Post issues postage stamps for "New Year's Greetings," in the hope that everyone will begin the year 2005 in a powerful fashion like the rooster that heralds the arrival of dawn after the nightly darkness.