Title: Definitive Stamp (1 (Old) Won)
U.S. Military Government Office "Won" Series
(View a picture of Moo-gung-wha/Rose of Sharon)
Has No Title
Stamp Serial#
20 
KPC#
52 
MICHEL#
16 
StanGib#
84 
Scott#
71 
Date of Issue
11/10/1946 
Quantity
20,000,000 
Denomination
1 (Old) Won 
Design
Hibiscus (Moo-gong-wha) and Rice 
Designer
Oh Choong-whan 
Image Area
18mmí┐22mm 
Perforation
12 
Sheet Composition
10í┐10 
Paper
White Japanese paper; no watermark
Printer
Kyung-hwa Printing Office 
Description
For its theme of design, the rose of Sharon (Hibiscus Syriacus), Korea's national flower, has been chosen in accordance with the thematic policy that favors things Korean for the design of low-priced stamps.

"Mugungwha", as the flower is called in Korean, is a deciduous shrub that belongs to Malvaceae. Growing to a height of 2-3m, with its flowers blooming over a long period from June to October, the Rose of Sharon has long been planted to serve as the house fence in the Korean countryside.

The flower was so widely diffused throughout the country that Korea was once called the "Land of Rose of Sharon" and began to be symbolized by it. Thus, without any government ever deciding on the national flower, Mungungwha began to be popularly recognized as such, during the late period of the Yi Dynasty, and has since kept its status.

To us Koreans, the rose of Sharon gives a special affective meaning as well. When we were denied our national flag by the Japanese colonial rule, the ubiquitous Rose of Sharon came into our hearts as the symbol of our country like the national flag. This is how our national flag, today, has come to have its pole top decorated with a Mugungwha bud.