Title: Folklore Series (2nd Issue) 
Dances
(View Souvenir Sheet)
Has No Title
Stamp Serial#
553 
KPC#
C-306 
MICHEL#
583 
StanGib#
699 
Scott#
555 
Date of Issue
06/15/1967 
Quantity
1,000,000 
Denomination
4 won 
Design
Sword Dance 
Designer
Kang Choon-whan 
Image Area
33mm*23mm 
Perforation
1312 
Sheet Composition
510 
Paper
Granite paper; unwatermarked
Printer
Government Printing & Mint Agency of the Repubic of Korea 
Description
The Ministry of Communications will feature our beautiful and graceful folklore dances - Sword dance, Buddhist monk dance and Peace-praying dance - on three different stamps valued at 4 won, 5 won and 7 won. It will be the second part of the folklore stamp series, issued by the Ministry.

Sword dance: The theme of a 4 Won stamp is sword dance, which dates back to the ancient Sylla Dynasty. The sword dance, highly regarded for its artistic value, used to be played in the royal court by a group of ranging from 4 to 8 dancers, attired in cambat clothes with helmets and it represents graceful and yet vivacious motions.With the passage of time, the dance has tended to change to a subdued and softend form of expression, though the sword dance being performed in the southern province of this country in said to be very close to what they originally were.

Dance praising perfect peace: The 5 Won stamp features peace praying dance, which was originated from Shamanism rituals for worshipping gods or anathematizing devils. Though slow in tempo, the brisk movement of feet in the dancing, seems to inspire peaceful and yet lively mood. This dance was originally performed by a queen or princess on occasions of national celebration or praying for the peace of the country. It was not until the late Yi Dynasty that this dance was adapted for presentation on stage.

Buddhist monk dance: The 7 Won stamp depicts the Buddhist monk dance which was developed from Buddhist rituals, following the introduction of Buddhism into this Country. This is an expression in physical motion of praising the virtues of Buddha and is considered a form of Buddhist`s ritualistic dances. A dancer, in a long black robe with a white cone-shaped hat on the head and a knapsack on the back, begins dancing, reciting a Buddhist prayer, which preaches on the teachings and blessings of Buddha, and conclude it with a violent drumming at the consummation of religious ecstasy. The Buddhist monk dance may well be regarded as typical of Korean folklore dance since it constitutes the core of our folklore dance and covers most of the techniques of the Korean folklore dancing.