Title: Organization and Agencies of the U.N.
Korean Flag
Has No Title
Stamp Serial#
741 
KPC#
C-497 
MICHEL#
780 
StanGib#
934 
Scott#
768 
Date of Issue
05/30/1971 
Quantity
500,000 
Denomination
10 won 
Design
Korean Flag 
Designer
Kang Choon-whan 
Image Area
33mm*23mm 
Perforation
13 
Sheet Composition
5Ąż10 
Paper
White unwatermarked
Printer
Government Printing & Mint Agency of the Repubic of Korea 
Description
In honor of the competence and meritorious achievements accomplished by the United Nations, the Ministry of Communications is to issue on May 30, 1971, a king-size postage stamp comprising 25 kinds of ordinary-size stamps with each of which depicting the major organizations and special agencies of the world organization and Tae Geuk Ki, the national flag of the Republic of Korea, respectively.

During the period of April through June, 1945, delegates from 50 nations gathered in San Francisco and adopted the Charter of the U.N. Indeed, the U.N., which was officially inaugurated on October 24 the same year as the largest international organization in history, has contributed a great deal to the promotion of world peace and welfare of mankind. A total of 127 countries from throughout the world are affiliated with the U.N. as its members.

Tae Geuk Ki, the Korean national flag: The national flag of the Republic of Korea symbolizes much of the thought, philosophy and mysticism of the Orient. Depicted on the flag is a circle divided equally and locked in perfect balance. The upper(red) section represents the Yang the lower(blue) section the Um, an ancient symbol of the universe originating in China. These two opposites express the dualism of the cosmos: Fire and water, day and night, dark and light, construction and destruction, masculine and feminfine, active and passive, heat and cold, plus and minus, and so on. The central thought in the Tae Geuk indicates that while there is a constant movement within the sphere of infinity, there are also balance and harmony. Three bars at each corner also carry the ideas of opposite and balance. The three unbroken lines stand for heaven; the opposite three broken lines represent the earth. At the lower left hand of the flag are two lines with a broken line in between. This symbolizes fire. The opposite is the symbol of water. It was in 1882, the 12th year of King Kojong of the Yi Dynasty, that Korea began to use Tae Geuk Ki as her national flag.