Title : Definitive Postage Stamp (300 Won)
Stamp Serial#
1064 
KPC#
278 
MICHEL#
1092 
StanGib#
1069c 
Scott#
1100 
Date of Issue
08/15/1977 
Quantity
To be issued as required 
Denomination
300Won 
Design
Palsang Jon of Pojusa Temple 
Designer
Chun, Hee Han 
Image Area
19mm22mm 
Perforation
1312 
Sheet Composition
1010 
Paper
White unwatermarked
Print
Government Printing & Mint Agency of the Repubic of Korea 
Description
The Ministry of Communications has decided to issue five kinds of definitive postage stamps on three occasions by means of offset printing employed hitherto. Two kinds of definitive stamps are hereby issued on this first occasion.: One is a 300-won denominination depiction of Palsang Jon of Pobjusa Temple, which is regarded to be the cream-of-the-crop in wooden buildings of ancient Korea, and another of 500-won denomination with a design of the gold crown excavated from Chonmachong, which may well remind us of the gorgeous thousand-year history of Silla.

1. Palsang jon of Pobjusa temple:
National Treasure No..55 Palsang Jon is the only five storied wooden building typical of the excellent technique of architecture performed in ancient Korea. The original wooden tower erected at the time of the construction of Pobjusa Temple was burnt down, and the present structure was reconstructed in 1624, the second year of King Into of the Yi Dynasty. One of the unique architectural characteristics of this wooden tower, is that the wooden pillar at its center rises up to the roof of the fifth floor. It is named Pal(eight)-sang Jon as eight large pieces of picture series describing the life of Buddha are mounted on the four walls inside the building.

2. Gold Crown of Chonmachong Mound:
This gold crown excavated from Chonmachong Mound(Ancient Royal Tomb No. 155) in Kyongju, the capital city of the ancient Silla Dynasty, is believed to have been used sometime between the fifth and sixth century during that dynasty. Being the largest of its kind, it has more crescent jades than any other crowns so far found, and is preserved at Kyongju National Museum.

On the front side of the circular base, made of a pretty thick and wide golden plate, are three -shaped vertical decorations in four stages, while two antler-shaped vertical decorations stand on the rear side. To either end of the front of the circular base of this typical gold crown of decorations. As numerous crescent jades and ems varying in size hang down from the circular base and vertical decorations, interlinked together along golden strings, they blow even in a breeze, glittering brilliantly.