Title : Postage Stamps of Nature Conservation Series (1st Issue)
Stamp Serial#
1121 
KPC#
C-802 
MICHEL#
1146 
StanGib#
1349 
Scott#
1150 
Date of Issue
02/20/1979 
Quantity
4,000,000 
Denomination
20 won 
Design
Lace Bark Pine 
Designer
Ahn Seung-kyung 
Image Area
23mmí┐33mm 
Perforation
13 
Sheet Composition
5í┐5 
Paper
White unwatermarked
Print
Government Printing & Mint Agency of the Republic of korea 
Description
All the people of our country, the Republic of Korea, are keenly aware that Nature is the very source of human lives and the fundimental basis of our daily life. This is why all of us are doing our level best in unity, for the conservation of our environment, exercising to the utmost the spirit of loving one's native land and country.

In the hope that the nationwide campaign for nature preservation will be carried out successfully, the Ministry of Communications has selected 10 kinds of animals and plants-five kinds each of the flora and fauna-that are gradually nearing extinction as the themes of postage stamps to be issued on five serial occasions this year. The two following items have been chosen for the first of the series:
1.Golden Mandarinfish(Siniperca scherzeri):
Mandarinfish (Siniperca scherzeri) is not a rare fish in our country. As its skin contains black, brown and yellowish pigment cells, the fish looks blackish brown or yellowish brown in most cases. From time to time, however, we can find golden yellowish ones, with more than half of the black and brown pigments worn away, which we specifically call Golden Mandarinfish. The coloring of Golden Mandarinfish is hereditary, just like in the case of a golden carp. Found only in the Han River in a very small quantity, Golden Mandarinfish has been designated as a natural monument. There is an unconfirmed rumor that Golden Mandarinfish is also found in the Kumgang and Naktonggang rivers.

2. Lace Bark Pine (Pinus bungeana Zuccarini, Pinaceae):
A native species of Hupeh and Hopeh, China, it was brought into Korea 600 years ago by our diplopmatic mission to China. Seven trees of Lace Bark Pine in Korea have been designated as natural monuments, of which four are in Seoul. It is called Lace Bark Pine as the bark exfoliates in large scales, leaving particolored portions on the surface of the trunk. We call it "Baik-Song" (White Pine), or "Baikkol-Song" (White Bone Pine), as the tree becomes chalky white as it gets older. Its flowers bloom in May and cones mature in October the following year. Although it was once considered quite difficult to transplant this species because of the poor growth of rootlets, Lace Bark Pine is increasing in number nowadays thanks to the advanced technique and grafting.