Title : Special Postage Stamps Commemorating the "5000 Years of Korean Art" Exhibition (3rd Issue)
Stamp Serial#
1148 
KPC#
C-820 
MICHEL#
1173 
StanGib#
1402 
Scott#
1175 
Date of Issue
10/15/1979 
Quantity
6,000,000 
Denomination
20 won 
Design
A White Porcelain Jar with Grape Design in Underglaze Iron 
Designer
Park Yeo-song 
Image Area
23mmí┐33mm 
Perforation
13 
Sheet Composition
5í┐5 
Paper
White unwatermarked
Print
Government Printing & Mint Agency of the Republic of korea 
Description
In commemoration of an exhibition of 354 artistic masterpieces representing "5000 years of Korean art", being held in seven major cities of the United States from May 1, 1979, through June 30, 1981, the Ministry of Communications has been issuing several Postage Stamps intended to give a fresh image of Korea as a nation with an abundant and unique cultural heritage of supreme quality. The following two newly issued stamps are the third pair of the series;
1. A White Porcelain Jar with Grape Design in Underglaze Iron.
This large porcelain jar, 53.3cm in height, is presumed to be a product of the seventeenth century. It is reputed to be one of the finest handcraft works for the Yi Dynasty (1392-1910), because of the beautiful grape design drawn on its body. Designated as National Cultural Treasure No. 107, it is now preserved in the museum of Ewha Women s university in Seoul.

Designs painted in underglaze iron began to appear in the early Yi Dynasty. In the middle Yi Dynasty the designs from the local kilns became highly abstract, while those from the government kilns remained realistic. This is a representative jar produced by the government kilns in the seventeenth century.

2. A Pottery Vessel in the shape of a Mounted Warrior.
This is one of two vessels excavated in 1924 from the golden bell tomb in Kyongju, and is designated as National Cultural Treasure No. 91. The protrusion from the horse's breast is the spout. Through the cup-shaped opening behind the back of the body of the mounted figure, water or liquor is poured into the body of the horse. The tail serves as the handle. This was used as a ceremonial vessel, and its sculpture is quite sophisticated. The nostrils and mouth are particularly lifelike