Title : Special Postage Stamps Commemorating the "5000 Years of Korean Art" Exhibition (9th Issue)
Stamp Serial#
1198 
KPC#
C-833 
MICHEL#
1223 
StanGib#
1457 
Scott#
1197 
Date of Issue
11/20/1980 
Quantity
6,000,000 
Denomination
30 won 
Design
Deva King 
Designer
Park Yeo-song 
Image Area
26mm*38mm 
Perforation
13 
Sheet Composition
5Ąż5 
Paper
White
Unwatermarked
Print
Government Printing & Mint Agency of the Republic of korea 
Description
The exhibition "5000 Years of Korean Art", has been held in the United States, in one city after another, since May 1, 1979 and is scheduled to continue through June 30, 1981, when it will have been held in a total of seven major cities.

In an attempt to make the abundant and unique artistic heritage of the Korean people known throughout the world, the Ministry of Communications seizes this occasion to issue special stamps featuring some of the exhibits and other works of art valued as national treasures. And the following two stamps are the last of the sets planned for this year, the 9th Issue, overall.

There is something special about these two stamps. It is that they are the first Korean stamps printed in intaglio (i.e., printed with an engraved plate). They depict the same object, a Deva King, in two different colors.
Deva King.
This sculpture is carved on a vestibule wall of "Sokkuram", an artificial stone-cave temple in Kyongju, the like of which is rarely found in Korea. One of its differentiating features is that is was made by man, whereas those found 751 A.D. by Kim Dae Sung, who also designed the famous Buddhist temple Bulkuksa. Constructed in the hey-day of the Unified Shilla Period, when Buddhism and its art were at their best in our history, this temple reflects the cream of the Buddhist art of the period.

This Deva King, carved at the entrance as a guard of the Buddha inside, stands barefoot with glaring eyes. Unlike the other sculptured figures inside the cave, it features well-developed muscles and thus symbolizes strength. Deva Kings are believed to have been placed at the entrances of Buddhist temples as guards of Buddhism because they represent strength and the wisdom to keep off worries of life.