Title : DEFINITIVE POSTAGE STAMPS
Ahn Joong-geun(1879-1910)
Stamp Serial#
1271 
KPC#
300 
MICHEL#
1297 
StanGib#
1379 
Scott#
1264 
Date of Issue
10/08/1982 
Quantity
To be issued as required 
Denomination
200 won 
Design
Ahn Joong-geun 
Designer
Chun Hee-han 
Image Area
19mm*22mm 
Perforation
13 
Sheet Composition
10Ąż10 
Paper
White
Unwatermarked
Print
Government Printing & Mint Agency of the Republic of korea 
Description
The Ministry of Communications seeks to make some of the historical personages of Korea known thoughout the world by issuing postage stamps depicting them. The following two definitive stamps are issued for this purpose.

1. Ahn Joong-geun (1879-1910).
Ahn Joong-geun, born in Hwanghae Province in the last days of the Yi Dynasty and educated both in the traditional and new studies, is one of the well-known anti-Japan patriots in the recent history of Korea. In revolt against the Japanese aggression of Korea formalized by the conclusion of the 1905 'Protectorate Treaty', he joined the anti-Japanese Righteous Army and fought against the aggression. In October, 1909, Ito Hirobumi, one of the highest-ranking Japanese officials who engineered the aggression of Korea, came to Harbin, Manchuria and gave a public address at a city park. Seizing this opportunity, Ahn infiltrated into the audience and shot him to death, thus giving vent to the deep-felt resentment of the Korean prople.

Throughout the whole painful course of his trials in Japanese courts. he protested. with awe-inspiring dignity, against the international crime of Japan. He was sentenced to death and the sentence was executed on March 26, 1910, in Lu-shun. In 1962. he was awarded posthumously the Order of Merit for National Foundation.

2. Ryu Kwan-soon (1904-1920).
Ryu Kwan-soon, born in Cheonan, Chungnam Province, is the Joan of Arc of Korea. The year after she entered Ewha Academy, the first girl's school of Korea, founded by the American Christian mission, she joined the 1919 Independence Movement, leading girls and women in the national demonstrations against the Japanese occupation. After Ewha Academy was closed down by the colonial goverment, she went home to Cheonan and there continued her campaign against the Japanese, organizing and leading public demonstrations. She had the tragedy of having her parents killed by the Japanese because of her patriotic activities. She was herself arrested and sentenced to seven years in prison. Imprisoned, she continued her resistance with other partiot prisoners by all possible means. The Japanese put her to such torture that she could not complete her sentenced term and died in prison. In 1962, she was awarded posthumously the Order of Merit for National Foundation.