Title : Postage Stamps for Folkways Series (2nd Issue)
Stamp Serial#
1394 
KPC#
C-1025 
MICHEL#
1418 
StanGib#
1684 
Scott#
1400 
Date of Issue
08/20/1985 
Quantity
4,000,000 
Denomination
70 won 
Design
Jangggi (Korean chess) 
Designer
LEE, Hye-ock 
Image Area
23mm*33mm 
Perforation
13 
Sheet Composition
Sheet of 20(5*4) 
Paper
White Unwatermarked
Print
Korea Security Printing and Minting Corporation 
Description
Daily social life of our ancestors is the foundation of our culture today. We must therefore look into the aspects of life in their days, through our traditional customs that are fading away, in order to trace the origins of our present life styles and thus understand our traditions correctly.

The Minstry of Communications will issue a series of postage stamps for the next few years with our traditional "Folkways" as the theme. The two following are the second of the series:

1.Wrestling.
This sport, played between two men, each wearing a thigh band, trying to bring the other man down to the ground, is a unique Korean style of wrestling. Traditionally, matches were held on the sands of the village stream, mainly on "Dano" festival day (15th of July on the lunar calendar). The final victor of the matches was given the title of "The Strongest Man under the Sky", and rewarded with an ox, an animal symbolic of physical strength.

Wrestling, which has traditional culture and folk sports combined in it, had new start as a mordern sport event with establishment of the Korea Association of Wrestling aroung 1927. It was divided into amateur and professional wretling around 1983 and has now been completely restored as a national sport.

2. Janggi, Korean chess.
Janggi is a traditional Korean game equivalent to Western chess. It was usually played by common people, whereas "baduk", another traditional game of entertainment, was played mainly by nobles. Janggi is the recent name of the game which used to be called "sanghi" or "sanghyuk". It is a game of intellect modeled after the form of a war, played by two persons, each with 16 pieces (soldier, horses, guns, tanks, etc...). This makes a "janggi game" noisy and interesting, and thus quite fit for lower-class people.