Title : POSTAGE STAMPS OF ANNIMALS
Stamp Serial#
1478 
KPC#
C-1122 
MICHEL#
1502 
StanGib#
1769 
Scott#
1484 
Date of Issue
02/25/1987 
Quantity
1,000,000 
Denomination
80 won 
Design
Vulpes velpes 
Designer
Kim, Ok-nam 
Image Area
33mm*23mm 
Perforation
13 
Sheet Composition
Sheet of 20(5*4) 
Paper
White Unwatermarked
Print
Korea Security Printing and Minting Corporation 
Description
The Ministry of Communications issues the following four postage stamps featuring four animals selected out of the species becoming extint in Korea.

1. Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).
The Siberian tiger, which belongs to the cat family, is no longer found in the central and southern parts of the Korean peninsula though a small number of its specimens are still found inhabiting the northern most regions. This subspecies of tiger, which is more larger than any other subspecies, its body length being about 4m and head length about 40cm, has its body covered with thin hair in summer and with thick hair in winter.

2. Wild cat (Felis bengalensis).
An animal of the cat family much larger than the domestic cat, the wild cat measures 40 to 50cm in length of body and 18 to 25cm in length of tail, but has relatively short legs. The animal, which inhabits the valleys of wooded or rocky mountains, had often been found in Korea until 1954, when it started on its way to extinction. Today only a small number of wild cats are kept in Seoul Grand Park.

3. Fox (Vulped vulpes).
A member of the family Canidae, this is a small animal resembling a dog in figure. Of the subspecies of fox, the red fox is the most widely scattered, ranging from Asia to Europe and North Africa and to North America. The fox weighing 6 to 10kg, has a 60 to 90cm long body, short slim legs, and a 34 to 60cm long tail. This animal, which lives mainly in wooded mountains but is also capable of adjusting to prairied and deserts, is now on its way to extinction in Korea where it was easily found even in hills before 1945.

4. Wild boar (Sus scrofa).
Preferring the mountains, especially where there are broad-leaved trees, the wild boar has a burly body, relatively short legs and a conspicuosly long mouth with sharp tusks, with which it tears up tree roots and fights an enemy. A wild hog that originally lived on grass, the animal has now turned omnivorous, preying on rabbits, field mice and any other small animal. Today the wild boar is found in Korea only deep in the mountains.