Title : NATIONAL MUSICAL INSTRUMENT SERIES(1st Issue)
Stamp Serial#
1660 
KPC#
C-1262 
MICHEL#
1684 
StanGib#
1967 
Scott#
1644 
Date of Issue
09/26/1991 
Quantity
2,000,000 
Denomination
100 won 
Design
Saeng-hwang 
Designer
Kim Sang-rak 
Image Area
23mm*33mm 
Perforation
13 
Sheet Composition
Sheet of 20(4*5) 
Paper
White Unwatermarked
Print
Korea Minting and Security Printing Corporation 
Description
The Ministry of Communications issues four postage stamps, with the theme of "National Musical Instruments", as the 1st Issue of the series, to publicize traditional Korean musical instruments.

1. Unra.
The Unra is an instrument which consistes of 10 small brass gongs hung on a wooden frame. To play this instrument, a performer uses a wooden hammer stick. When palyed, the instrument makes light sounds. During processional marches, a handle underneath the instrument is used for holding it. When played while sitting down, it is propped up on a support. Unra has been in use for military marches since the late Chosun Dymasty period.

2. Jing.
According to historical records, the name of this instrument varies with the occasions: when played during religious ceremonies for royalty, it is called "Daegum"; for military, court, or farm music, it is called "Jing". In particular, for the farm music, "Jing" is played at the beginning of each rhythm, while the "Ggwengga-ri" (small gong) is played for rapid beats.

3. Saeng-hwang.

The Saeng-hwang is a free-reed mouth organ, and has a number of bamboo pipes of different length. There is a hole underneath the bamboo pipes which is used to control sound. Moreover, there is a metal piece which makes sound when inhaling and exhaling into the instrument. Such a principle of playing this instrument is similar to that of a harmonica.

4. Galgo.
Size and shape of Galgo are similar to those of "Janggo", an hourglass-shaped Korean drum. However, leather on each end of the Galgo is thinner than that of "Janggo" and there is also a bind on each side. Futhermore , it is played with two sticks unlike the "Janggo", which is played with one stick and one hand. The Galgo has been in use since after King Yeong-jo's reign, during the Chosun Dynasty period. However, it is no longer in use.