Title : KOREAN BEAUTY SERIES (3rd Issue)
Stamp Serial#
1736 
KPC#
C-1318 
MICHEL#
1760 
StanGib#
2071 
Scott#
1665 
Date of Issue
10/11/1993 
Quantity
2,000,000 
Denomination
110Won 
Design
Po of the king 
Designer
Lee Hye-ok 
Image Area
23mm*33mm 
Perforation
13 
Sheet Composition
Sheet of 20(5*4) 
Paper
White Unwatermarked
Print
Government Printing & Mint Agency of the Republic of korea 
Description
The Ministry of Communications has been issuing postage stamps of the Korean Beauty Series which depict Korean lifestyles, nature, and traditional culture. Traditional insignias (Hyoongbae) embroidered on the chest and back of government official dress in the Chosun Dynasty, are chosen as the designs of the 4 kinds of postage stamps of this third collection.

Rank insignia was called "Po" when worn by the family, and "Hyoongbae" when worn by government officials. King's "Po" was attached on the shoulders, chest, and back of the "Konryong-Po" (kings official dress). The design used in 1850 was selected for this collection. A dragon symbolizing the King is snugly encircled by the curve patterns of the background.

The "Single-Crane Insignia" was used for civil officials ranging from 4th to 9th rank. This insignia used in 1600 features a crane which fully spread its wings and flies through colorful clouds with a plant of eternal youth in its beak. The crane stands for the dignified civil servant. And the waterdrops, plant of eternal youth, cloisonne patterns, waves and swastika are well balanced in harmony.

The "Twin-Crane Insignia" was originally worn by civil officials ranging from 1st to 3rd rank. But it is presumed that this insignia must have been used on a grooms wedding ceremonial dress at the time. Twin cranes with the plant of eternal youth in their beaks are embroidered on red satin with floral patterns. Clouds, rocks, waves, water stream and coin patterns are arranged around the twin cranes with fully spread wings.

The Twin-Tiger Insignia was used for military ranging from 1st to 3rd rank. This insignia used in 1720 was embroidered on sky-blue satin with patterns of clouds. And it shows a tiger turning its head to face the other tiger in the background. The symbol of the Tae-guk is placed in the center. Surrounding the tigers are nineteen colorful clouds, waves, rocks, water streams, and pine trees. A tiger stepping on a towering rock, expresses the brave spirit of a warrior.