Title : DEFINITIVE POSTAGE STAMPS
Stamp Serial#
1854 
KPC#
382 
MICHEL#
1878 
StanGib#
2042 
Scott#
1851 
Date of Issue
03/20/1996 
Quantity
To be issued as required 
Denomination
420 won 
Design
Traditional drums and drum dance 
Designer
Chun Hee-han 
Image Area
22mm*19mm 
Perforation
12*13 
Sheet Composition
10*10 
Paper
White unwatermarked
Print
Korea Minting and Security Printing Corporation 
Description
In accordance with change of domestic postal rates on October 16, 1995, the Ministry of Information and Communication has decides to reissue two definitive stamps. These stamps were first issued on March 22, 1993, one with a denomination of 370 won and the other with 440 won. They will now be replaced by 420-won and 480-won stamps respectively.

Korea uses over 20 kinds of traditional drums. They are commonly covered at both ends of a shell of wood or metal with a leather membrance, producing sound through the direct striking of a stick or two sticks. Records show that drums have been used since the Three Kingdoms Period(B.C. 1stA.D.7th century). They are employed in nong-ak (farmer's music) and as an accompaniment for a long narrative song form called pansori. Along with the beating of the drum, the Drum Dance is primaily performed while playing nong-ak, as part of a Buddhist ritual.

The Hahoe Masque, which was designated as National Treasure No.121, refers to the wooden masks worn by performers of a shaman's kut(exorcism), which originated in the Hahoe village of Kyonsang-buk-do province. They are belived to have been made during the 11th and 12th century for both sacred and artistic purposes. The masks are highly regarded as valuable tangible cultural assets of Korea for their expert crafrsmanship.

Ssirum is a form of traditional Korean wrestling. In ssirum, two men grab the other's loincloth, called the satba which is wrapped around the waist and thigh, until one falls on the ground and is beaten.

The swing competition for women, is a popular activity during the traditional Tano holiday which falls on the fifth day of the fifth lunar month.

In issuing these postage stamps, the Ministry of Information and Communication hopes to spread knowledge at home and aboad on the rich cultural heritage of Korea, depicting scenes which epitomize the nation's unique tradition and custom, and at the same time to provide added convenience to postal customers.