Title : LITERATURE SERIES (3rd Issue)  (View Souvenir Sheet)
Stamp Serial#
1936 
KPC#
C-1468 
MICHEL#
1960 
StanGib#
2270 
Scott#
1821 
Date of Issue
12/12/1997 
Quantity
3,000,000 
Denomination
170 won 
Design
Wang o Ch'on ch'uk-guk Jon 
Designer
Chun, Hee-han 
Image Area
23mm*33mm 
Perforation
13 
Sheet Composition
4*5 
Paper
White unwatermarked
Print
Korea Security Printing and Minting Corporation 
Description
Appreciate literature through stamps! The Ministry of Information and Communication has been issuing stamps featuring the Korean literary works. This third collection of literature series being issued this year features Yo Sui-jang U Jung-Mun Shi Poem, and Wang O Ch'onch'uk-guk Jon.

Yo Sui-jang U Jung-Mun Shi Poem ('A Poem to the Sui General Yu Zhong Wen')
The wonder of thy resourcefulness touched the science of Heaven
The Profundity of thy schemes reaches the reasoning of Earth
Thy victory already distinguished thyself highly
I wish thou be contented and repose thyself.
This poem, also Known as Yu U Jung-Mun, is a Chinese poem written by the famed Koguryo General, Ulchi Mundok who served under King Yoongyang. It was sent to the Sui General, Yu Zhong Wen, ('U Jung-mun' in Korean). This poem sheds light on the resourcefulness and prowess of Ulchi Mundok. He led his outnumbered army to glorious victory in a battle against Sui troops. Yo Sui-jang U Jung-mun Shi Poem, is recorded in Samguk sagi(History of the Three Kingdoms) and is also included in anthologies of Chinese poems including Tongmunson(Anthology of the Eastern Country Literature).

Wang O Ch'onch'uk-guk Jon
Over twelve hundred years ago, Hye Ch'o(704-787) a Buddhist monk who lived during the Unified Shilla Period, traveled to India by land and sea. Wang O Ch'onch'uk-guk Jon, which means "Record of Travel to Five Indian Kingdoms", is an account of Hye Ch'o's pilgrimages to historic Buddhist sites in five Indian kingdoms, Kashmir, Afghanistan, and Central Asia. It also describes the geography and local customs of the towns through which he had passed. This book was discovered in 1908 by a Frenchman, P. Pelliot, at the Thousand Buddha caves in Dunhuang, China, and it is currently preserved at the Paris National Library. This stamp offers a glimpse of eighth century India as Hye Ch'o saw it.