Title : DEFINITIVE POSTAGE STAMP
Stamp Serial#
1945 
KPC#
398 
MICHEL#
1969 
StanGib#
Not listed 
Scott#
1854 
Date of Issue
04/04/1998 
Quantity
To be issued as required 
Denomination
800 won 
Design
Cheju pony (National Monument No. 347) 
Designer
Lee, Gi-seog 
Image Area
33mm*23mm 
Perforation
13 
Sheet Composition
5*10 
Paper
White unwatermarked
Print
Korea Security Printing and Minting Corporation 
Description
The Ministry of Information and Communication is continuing to phase in new definitive stamps to replace those which have been in use for some time. The 800 won definitive stamp showing a 'Flagole with Dragonheaded Knob', was first issued on July 1, 1990, and it is being replaced by one displaying a 'Cheju pony'.

The famous, indigenous horses of Cheju-do, "Cho-rang-mal", can be seen grazing while walking leisurely on the expansive grassy slopes of Mt. Halla. As becomes readily evident in the old saying, "Send your son to Seoul and your horse to Cheju", Cheju has been famous for its native ponies for quite a long time. The Cheju ponies (Equus caballus), a breed of native ponies, are an important part of Korean heritage. It is believed that the Cheju stock of ponies which had been distributed on the Korean peninsula a long time ago, were cross-bred with horses brought to Cheju from China by the Mongolian army, after the Mongol invasion during the Koryo dynasty(1276-1376). The Cheju ponies have evolved into a truly unique breed of horse well-ajusted to the natural environment of Cheju.

Since the Cheju native ponies are considerably smaller than their western counterparts, they are also called "Kwahama" (horse that is able to pass under a fruit tree without touching it), or "T' ojongma" (indigenous horse). A full-growm Cheju pony stands about 115 to 120 cm high and has a sandy-colored coat. It has a big head, big round eyes, a thick neck, and short thick limbs. It is characterized by very strong hooves. As they are very docile, the Cheju ponies were used as beasts of burden in farming or transportation. These days, however, their number has sharply fallen as farming operations and transportation have become increasingly mechanized. Pure-blooded Cheju ponies are also in serious danger of being bred out of extinction due to increasing crossbreds, as a result of a lack of an effective breeding program. For their preservation, the Korean government designated the Cheju pony as National Mounment No. 347 in 1985.

Enjoy meeting the Cheju pony through this stamp!