Title : Information Culture Special
Stamp Serial#
1953 
KPC#
C-1482 
MICHEL#
1977 
StanGib#
2289 
Scott#
1934a 
Date of Issue
06/01/1998 
Quantity
2,000,000 
Denomination
170 won 
Design
Love Letters of the Primitive 
Designer
Park, Soo-dong Park, Eun-Kyung 
Image Area
32mm*22mm 
Perforation
13 
Sheet Composition
4*4 
Paper
White unwatermarked
Print
Korea Security Printing and Minting Corporation 
Description
One who has good access to information will control the future! The transition from agrarian society to industrial society brought about a tidal wave of revolutionary change in the human community. And now the information society is sweeping the industrial society aside. In the 21st century, the ability to make the best and most efficient use of the real barrage of information deluging our society will spell the difference between success and failure. In order to function effectively in the increasingly information oriented society, and to boost public awareness and promote universal utilization of information, June was designated as the information culture month in Korea. The Ministry of Information and Communication is commemorating "Information Culture" month with a special issue of four stamps.

The information culture took on many different forms throughout the ages. These special stamps depict the evolution of information culture since prehistoric times. How did primitive people communicate before recorded history?

Along with conveying messages through the spoken word, communication was through a series of cave drawings. The drawings served as a means of recording information, as manifest in the "Love Letters of the Primitive". As humankind engaged in a wider range of activities later on, the need for means of conveying information to far-off places gave rise to such arrangements as the "Pony Express and Beacon Fire" postal systems. During the Industrial Revolution, rapid progress was made everywhere. In Information and telecommunications, the telegraph and telephone allowed people to deliver large amounts of information quickly over long distances for the first time. The presonified picture of "A Mailbox and a Telephone", which graces one of the stamps, commemorates this development in information culture.

Now the widespread distribution of computers, wired and wireless communications, as well as satellite communications, has made possible the autonomous acquisition and exchange of information. We have to ask, what will be the paradigms of information culture in the future? What comes to mind is an information utopia where humanity, technology, and nature coexist harmoniously, and intellect and sensitivity freely interace.