Title : Literature Series (4th Issue)  (View Souvenir Sheet)
Stamp Serial#
1963 
KPC#
C-1492 
MICHEL#
1991 
StanGib#
2302 
Scott#
1823 
Date of Issue
09/14/1998 
Quantity
3,000,000 
Denomination
170Won 
Design
Kasiri 
Designer
Lee, Hye-ock 
Image Area
26*36 
Perforation
13 
Sheet Composition
4*5 
Paper
White unwatermarked
Print
Korea Security Printing and Minting Corporation 
Description
The Ministry of Information and Communication has been issuing series of stamps featuring major Korean literary works, every year, to stimulate interest and foster the love of Korean literature. This year's series features "Samogok" (Thinking of Mother) and "Kasiri" (Would You Leave Me Now?), two sogyo (literally ""secular songs"") from the Chosan dynasty.

The lyrics of Koryo Sogyo were delightful and also very popular. They were passed down through the generations among common people by mouth, and they eventually became modified and integrated into the music of the court. They are now preserved for future generations in "Akchang-Kasa" (Anthology of Musical Texts), "Akhak-kwoebom" (Canon of Musical Science), and "Shiyong-Hyangakbo" (Scores of Traditional Native Music), all compiled after the invention of the Korean alphabet during the Choson dynasty. Since these songs had their origins in folk song tradition, the style of sogyo is distinctly simple and straighforward, flowing with full and frank expression to the feelings of the people and beautiful rhythms. These songs were refined further in the process of oral transmission.

"Kasiri" (Would You Leave Me Now?).
"Would you leave me, leave me now? Would you forsake me now? Wi jungjulag the piping times of peace......" "Kasiri" is a song expressing regret at sending away a lover. Also known is "Kwihogok" (Song Praying for a Love's Return), this plaintive song, couched in simple and innocent expression, communicates the depth of emotion of one who has been left behind. It consists of four stanzas with the refrain "Wi jungjulag the piping times of peace" to every stanza, giving a sense of rhythm to the song. All of the lyrics are recorded in "Akchang-Kasa" (Anthology of Musical Texts) and the first stanza is included in "Shiyong-Hyangakbo" (Scores of Traditional Native Music).

"Samogok" (Thinking of Mother).
"Though a weeding hoe has an edge, it does not cut like a sickle......" The song "Samogok" pays tribute to a mother's love. It likens a mother and father to a sickle and a weeding hoe respectively, for a father's love is no match for a mother's love and devoition. The narration and score are recorded in "Shiyong-Hyangakbo" (Scores of Traditional Native Muisc), while the lyrics are recorded in "Akchang-Kasa" (Anthology of Musical Texts).