Title : Registration of Korean Cultural Treasures as Parts of the World Heritage
(View Special Sheet)
Stamp Serial#
2032 
KPC#
C-1547 
MICHEL#
2060 
StanGib#
2366 
Scott#
1983b 
Date of Issue
12/09/1999 
Quantity
1,200,000 
Denomination
340 won 
Design
Chongmyo Grand Ceremony 
Designer
Won, In-jae 
Image Area
52mm*36mm 
Perforation
13 
Sheet Composition
2*5 
Paper
White unwatermarked
Print
Korea Minting and Security Printing Corporation 
Description
Following the artificial grotto of the Sokkuram and Pulguk-sa Temple in Kyongju, the wood blocks of Tripitaka Koreana and their storage building at Haein-sa Temple, the Chongmyo royal shrine graces this special stamp being issued in commemoration of the inclusion of these cultural assets on the World Heritage List.

Chongmyo, a Space of Reserved Beauty.
Chongmyo is the royal ancestral shrine where the memorial tablets of the deceased kings and their queen consorts of the Choson Dynasty are enshrined and worshipped. Since it was built for memorial services, the shrine renders a perfect example of a Confucian-influenced simple and economical architectural style, neither redundantly flamboyant nor superfluously decorative. Chong-jon, the main hall, is extremely long across the front, with a special emphasis on horizontality. This shrine is thought to be the world's largest individual wooden building from that period, with a floor area of 2.270. Its architectural style is peculiar to Korea, bearing no resemblance to that of China--the birthplace of royal shrines--or to Western architecture.

Chongmyo, Grand Ceremony with Melodies of Five Hundred Years Ago.
Ceremonies at Chong-jon, during the Choson Dynasty, were reportedly performed five times a year; in the spring, summer, autumn, and winter as well as the last month of the lunar calendar. Today a grand ceremony is held on the first Sunday on May, accompanied by Chongmyo Cherye-ak, performances of instrumental music, vocal renditions, and dances to pay homage to ancestral spirits. The formalities, foods, dinnerware, musical instruments, and equipment, as well as music and dances for the ceremonial rites all originated in the ceremonial culture of ancient China, with most of the Oriental culture well-preserved.

Therefore, if you are interested in the nature and features of ancient Oriental culture, this great cultural heritage has a lot to offer to you.