Traditional Culture Special
From 2003.03.19 to 2004.08.20

The special stamps on "Traditional Korean Culture" are issued to demonstrate the wisdom and aesthetic sensitivity of our ancestors by showcasing articles used everyday by them.

 

Introduced in the first of the series are footwear worn for both protection and adornment. The materials and types of shoes varied widely according to gender, social status, occupation and attendant attire.

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/Issued 2003.03.19.

Introduced in the second bundle of the series are "sedan chairs" which were the main mode of transportation in the olden days.

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/Issued 2003.05.19.

Introduced in the third series are lighting facilities.

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/Issued 2003.07.25.

Introduced in the fourth series is soban, a small portable wooden dining table. The soban featured in the stamps are preserved at Ewha Womans University Museum.

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/Issued 2003.09.25.

The fifth issue in the Traditional Culture Special, introduces Korea's traditional needlework tools. Since ancient times, the needle, thread, ruler, thimble, scissors, soldering iron, and flatiron were considered as the "seven best friends in a lady's sitting room (known in Korean as gyujungchiru), and women were never without them. These stamps, illustrating needlework equipment dating from the late Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), are displayed at the National Folk Museum of Korea.

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/Issued 2004.06.24

The sixth and last edition of the "Traditional Culture Special" features different types of traditional hats that were used according to the people's social status and ceremonial occasions. People wore these hats for the sake of protection and ornamentation. Integrating practical, ornamental, and symbolic meaning, traditional hats worn at the time evolved into a variety of types. Those illustrated on the stamps currently belong to the National Folk Museum of Korea.

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/Issued 2004.08.20

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